A Concerning Trend: Massachusetts Districts Asking Parents to Waive Special Education Rights

In a recently published article, the Boston Globe reports that during this past spring, many school districts across the state asked parents to forgo their children’s special education rights by signing waivers releasing the districts from important special education obligations. These waivers have included releasing districts from providing IEP-related services and programming, conducting special education assessments, and issuing IEPs within state and federal timelines. That districts would request such waivers is concerning enough, in light of clear federal and state guidance that districts must adhere to these obligations despite the COVID-19 crisis. Further concerning is how districts have presented these waivers. Attorneys, parents, and advocates have stated that districts have portrayed the signing of these waivers as a necessary condition for parents to get IEP Team meetings scheduled or for certain services to continue. As a result, many less informed or less assertive parents consented to the waivers, misled by the districts to believe that they had no choice but to do so if they wanted their children to receive assessments, services, or meetings to which the families were in fact already entitled.

As discussed in our May 5, 2020 blog post, the U.S. Department of Education (“USDOE”) and the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (“DESE”) have explicitly stated that, despite COVID-19-related issues, school districts must continue providing their students with special education services and programming and that special education timelines (including timelines for completion of assessments, convening Team meetings, and issuing IEPs) must be followed. On a May 1, 2020 Zoom call with the state’s special education directors, Massachusetts’ State Director of Special Education, Russell Johnston, commented that waivers of these obligations “aren’t going to hold up.” On May 21, 2020, DESE issued guidance, noting that school districts cannot ask for such waivers.

The Globe reports that a Massachusetts special education activist group, SPEDWatch, has filed complaints against twenty-five school districts, with seventeen of them accused of pushing these waivers on parents. Eleven have been found noncompliant and reprimanded by DESE; the other seven remain under investigation. The noncompliant districts have been required to notify parents that the waivers that the parents previously signed are void. However, parents and their attorneys remained concerned that other districts are continuing these practices, or are forgoing the waiver but ignoring special education timelines.

Guidance from USDOE and DESE strongly suggests that previously signed waivers are invalid. As discussed above, it is clear that districts must continue providing special education students with a free appropriate public education and follow mandated special education timelines. Parents should be mindful of districts presenting these waivers or using COVID-19-related issues as justification for failing to provide special education services and programming and/or failing to timely hold IEP Team meetings, conduct evaluations, and issue IEPs. Parents who have previously signed such waivers should not wait for their districts to retract them, but should consider notifying the district in writing that they have learned that the waiver is illegal and are therefore withdrawing their previous consent to excuse the district from its obligations. (As always, parents are advised to consult an experienced special education attorney or advocate about their child’s particular situation.)

Nathan Y. Sullivan is an associate in the Special Education & Disability Rights practice group at Kotin, Crabtree & Strong, LLP in Boston, Massachusetts.

2 thoughts on “A Concerning Trend: Massachusetts Districts Asking Parents to Waive Special Education Rights

  1. Nathan: Thanks so much for writing about this. If you are interested in learning more about SPEDWatch just let me know and I will send you some info.

    Ellen Chambers
    SPEDWatch Founder

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